Fr. Caussade on bearing afflictions

 

Today we offer an essay by Père Caussade,  “Bearing Up with the Crisis and Chastisement of the Faith.” Although his counsel is for a cloistered nun, you’ll soon see how apt it is for us today as we endure the reign of this most miserable of popes.

The disaster of which you speak is, as you say, a most visible scourge of God; happy will they be who take advantage of it to save their souls. These punishments, borne well, as from the hands of God, are of more value than all worldly prosperity. At the same time they may be made, by a bad use, the occasion to some of eternal reprobation.

This will be, however, entirely by their own fault, and their very great fault, for what could be more reasonable, or easier in a sense than to make, as I said before, a virtue of necessity? Why make a useless and criminal resistance to the chastisements of God, Who is our Father and Who strikes us only to detach us from the miserable pleasures of this world? Could He do us a greater favour than to deliver us from attaching ourselves to that which would cause us to lose eternal happiness and our own souls!

On such occasions it is well to think often and attentively of this passage in the writings of one of the Fathers of the Church. “Such is the goodness of our heavenly Father that even His anger proceeds from His mercy, since He only strikes us to withdraw us from sin, and to save us.” Like a wise surgeon He cuts the mortified flesh away from that which is sound to save the life of the patient, and to prevent the infection from spreading. We should accustom ourselves to see everything in the light of faith; and then no event of this life, nor desires, nor fears will have any effect on us. Those strong hopes that so frequently upset the peace of the soul and the tranquil course of life, even those will make very little impression on us. How blind men are! and how much attached to their own ideas!

How rarely one meets with anyone who will own that he has been obliged to seek and to take good advice! St. Francis de Sales had good reason to say that we are all wanting in sense. At least let us understand the depth of the misery and blindness into which sin has caused us to fall. Let us learn from this to be always distrustful of ourselves, and to guard against our own judgments and perverse ideas.

St. Catherine of Siena was so convinced of the truth of this that she wished she could cry out constantly in a way to be heard by everyone: “Lord help me, come to my assistance and have pity on me!” Do not forget in future that a simple “Fiat” with regard to your present pains, and to those which you fear in the future either for yourself, or for others, will suffice to amass for you a treasure of peace even on earth. If this practice does not bring perfect peace immediately, it will, at least, fill your soul with joy and enable you to taste a solid consolation in all your pains and fears.

Far from pitying you I consider that you are more to be congratulated on having, at last, an opportunity of practising true charity. The antipathy you feel towards the person with whom you have such continual intercourse, the difference in your ideas and tastes, the offence she causes you by her manners and conversation are so many infallible signs that the charity you show her is purely supernatural and without any admixture of human feeling. This will be a way of amassing pure gold, and it depends entirely on yourself whether or not you will heap up an immense treasure. Be grateful, therefore, to the good God and in order to lose nothing of the inestimable advantages of your present position follow out exactly the rules that I will now give you.

1. Bear patiently the involuntary feelings of disgust that this Sister’s behaviour causes you, just as you would bear a sudden attack of fever or megrim (migraine). Your antipathy is really, in fact, an interior fever, with its shivering and paroxysms. This is very crucifying, humiliating and painful, consequently is more meritorious and sanctifying.

2. Never speak, as perhaps the others do, about this Sister unless to speak kindly about her, remembering that she has her good qualities. And which of us is without bad ones? Who is perfect in this world? It is possible that without your will or knowledge you are as great a trial to her as God allows her to be to you. God often polishes one diamond by friction with another, says Fenelon.

3. When you have committed some fault in this matter do not distress yourself but humble yourself quietly without voluntary vexation either with her or yourself, without anxiety, annoyance or uneasiness. If we treat our faults in this way they will be to our profit and advantage. God keeps us in a state of true humility by these miseries, and the daily faults by which we discover our own pettiness.

4. For the rest, unless your duty obliges you, do not meddle in anything that is said or done, let everything go on without speaking or thinking about it. Abandon all to divine Providence. What does it matter if everything goes, if everything perishes, provided that we belong to God and save our souls? But, I almost hear you say, if such or such a thing should happen what shall I do? This! I will take no notice, I will have nothing to do with it, because I should be sorry to lose this happy state of abandonment which makes me live in complete and absolute dependence on God from day to day, hour to hour, moment to moment, without a thought of the future, nor even of tomorrow.

Tomorrow will take care of itself. He who sustains us today with His invisible hand, will sustain us tomorrow. The manna in the desert was only given from day to day, and whoever, through want of confidence, or a false wisdom, gathered it up for the next day, found it spoilt. Let us not in our anxious and ignorant foresight make unnecessary provision for ourselves, when God in His wisdom and foreknowledge provides for us.

Let us depend entirely on His fatherly care and abandon ourselves to it utterly both for our temporal concerns and our spiritual and eternal interests. This is true and total abandonment which binds God to take all under His care with respect to those who abandon all and thus pay that honour to His sovereign dominion, His power, wisdom, goodness and mercy that is due to all His infinite perfections. Amen.

(From Fr. de Caussade’s “Abandon à la Providence Divine,” edited by Fr. H. Ramière, S. J., Wilder Publications, Inc.. Kindle Edition.)

†  Remember – Our Lady needs us to obey:  First Saturdays of Reparation, daily rosary, at least 5 mysteries, wear her brown scapular and live your Total Consecration to her Immaculate Heart, offering daily duties in reparation and for the conversion of poor sinners.

  Immaculate Heart of Mary, Queen of our hearts, Mother of the Church, do thou offer to the Eternal Father the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, for the conversion of poor sinners, especially our Pontiff.
  Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Thy kingdom come! Viva Cristo Rey!
  Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death.
  St. Joseph, protect us, protect our families, protect our priests.
  St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.

Please pray for the Consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary!

~ by evensong for love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ, King.
Vouchsafe that I may praise thee, O Sacred Virgin! Give me strength against thine enemies!

Thoughts of St. Francis de Sales for Lent

 

For Ash Wednesday, to start Lent off right.

I was won over to St. Francis de Sales when I obtained a battered paperback copy of his “Introduction to the Devout Life” for 25 cents in our church thrift shop many  years ago, and recently have been reading an ebook of his as part of my Lenten reading.  “The Saint Francis de Sales Collection, 16 Books”, by Catholic Way)

Here are some excerpts from this great Saint:

A Time of Fear
What words can oppose the flood of thoughts troubling your heart? Do not attempt to stop them; that will only make the pain worse. Do not try to conquer the temptations; the effort will only make them stronger. Disdain them, and do not dwell on them. Bring to mind an image of Jesus Christ crucified and say, “Here is my hope; here is the flowing fountain of my happiness. Here is the heart of my soul and the soul of my heart.” Hear our Lord say to Abraham and to you: “Be not afraid; I am your protector” (cf. Gen. 15:1). What is it that you seek upon the earth other than your God? And you already possess Him.

Be firm in your resolutions. Stay in the boat. Let the storm come. While Jesus lives, you will not die. He is sleeping, but He will awaken to calm the storm at the right time (Matt. 8:24-26). St. Peter, the Scriptures tell us, saw the great storm and was afraid, and as soon as he was afraid, he began to sink and drown. Whereupon he cried out, “O Lord, save me!” And our Lord took him by the hand and said to him, “O man of little faith, why did you doubt?” (Matt. 14:29-31). See this great apostle: he walked with dry feet upon the water, protected from wind and wave, but the fear of the wind and the wave would have killed him had not his Master relieved him.

(In that way) Fear is a greater evil than evil itself. O you of little faith: what is it you fear? Do not be afraid. You are walking on water, amid wind and wave, but you are with Jesus. What is there to fear? If fear takes hold of you, cry out strongly, “O Lord, save me!” He will hold out a hand to you. Hold on tight, and go forward with joy. (I love that quote!)

Continue reading “Thoughts of St. Francis de Sales for Lent”

Obedience and Our Mother’s Rosary

 

Obedience

“He was wounded for our iniquities … bruised for our sins: the chastisement of our peace was upon Him, and by His bruises we are healed.”

Among the many things to love about the rosary, is the way the various mysteries interconnect and thereby reinforce and enrich each other. In general, the Joyful Mysteries emphasize the virtue of obedience. This obedience is reinforced by the Sorrowful Mysteries. Mary’s “Be it done unto me according to thy word”, in the Annunciation is echoed by Christ’s, “Yet not My will, but Thine be done.” in the Agony in the Garden. And then the Glorious Mysteries reveal the joyful glory of our heavenly reward, which follows this obedience and is eternal!

St. Augustine tells us, “And thus also it was that the knot of Eve’s disobedience was loosed by the obedience of Mary. For what the virgin Eve had bound fast through unbelief, this did the virgin Mary set free through faith” (Apology, Book II, Chapter XII).

Regarding obedience, St. John Bosco was given a horrible vision of Hell in which his guide told him that the most serious sin causing people to be damned in Hell is the sin of disobedience. He explained that while pride is the root of sin, its practical application is disobedience, in other words, prideful disobedience causes the most people to fall from grace and be doomed to Hell. And so  between St. Augustine and St. John Bosco, we see that a key to disobedience is the refusal of faith. Had Eve accepted the virtue of faith offered to her, she would not have disobeyed. There is a lesson here for disobedient prelates, but I digress…

St. John tells us in his First Epistle, Chapter Two, “For all that is in the world, is the concupiscence of the flesh, and the concupiscence of the eyes, and the pride of life, which is not of the Father, but is of the world. And the world passeth away, and the concupiscence thereof: but he that doth the will of God, abideth for ever.” Now, it has always been the teaching of the Church, from the earliest times that the evangelical counsels of chastity, poverty and obedience counteract these sins.

Although these counsels are vowed by those in the consecrated life, we of the lay faithful are urged to practice them according to our state. The lust of the flesh can thereby be counteracted by modesty and faithfulness to one’s spouse, the lust of the eyes, that is greed and consumerism can be counteracted by moderation, humility and self-denial such as fasting and abstaining. But it is with our obedience, which defeats pride, that we progress the best, no matter our state in life. The very best teacher of obedience is Mary, Our Mother.

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Auto-demolition

The following is a post from 2015 and is outdated. I’ve chosen to leave it that way to give you a glimpse of what was and what has been “accomplished” since then under the most humble Bishop of Rome.

Miserabilism demands that the Church and her hierarchy divest of all properties and splendor and become truly indigent. It was evident particularly in the Protestant revolution which hated the beauty of Catholic art, architecture, music and all that caused the Church to have dignity. Miserabilism would strip the Church of her beauty, both spiritual and temporal in the name of a false humility.This heretical tendency is among the many that were part of the revolution of Vatican II and now reaches its full flowering in miserabilist Pope Francis, the First Humble Pope in History®.

Msgr. Eugenio Pacelli, the future Pope Pius XII, made this astonishing prophecy on the future upheaval in the Church:

“I am worried by the Blessed Virgin’s messages to Lucia of Fatima. This persistence of Mary about the dangers which menace the Church is a divine warning against the suicide of altering the Faith, in Her liturgy, Her theology and Her soul. … I hear all around me innovators who wish to dismantle the Sacred Chapel, destroy the universal flame of the Church, reject Her ornaments and make Her feel remorse for Her historical past.

“A day will come when the civilized world will deny its God, when the Church will doubt as Peter doubted. She will be tempted to believe that man has become God. In our churches, Christians will search in vain for the red lamp where God awaits them. Like Mary Magdalene, weeping before the empty tomb, they will ask, ‘Where have they taken Him?'” (Roche, Pie XII Devant L’Historie, p. 52-53, quoted by Father Kramer in “The Devil’s Final Battle”, 2002, Good Counsel Publications. Thorough documentation on this quote, including the date, 1933, can be found at the website of Atila Sinke Guimaraes, Tradition in Action.)

The doctrine of the Immaculate Conception was defined and proclaimed in the 19th century, and early in the 20th century, our Lord Jesus Christ sent His Mother to request devotion to her Immaculate Heart as a remedy for the increasing heresies of scientism and modernism, the increasing apostasy from the faith. Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary is absolutely inimical to the Lord of the World, Satan, who is at war always and everywhere with the Church, the Bride of Christ, and with her Mother. Exorcists have amply demonstrated this intense hatred which Satan bears for the Blessed Virgin Mary, and his impotence where she is concerned. This is documented in the writings of Fathers Gabriele Amorth, Malachi Martin and Leon Cristiani.

Satan’s immense pride demands that he not be subject to the truly pure and humble Virgin of Nazareth. And that is precisely why Jesus Christ wills that the instrument He will use (and is using!) for the ultimate humiliating defeat of the so-called “Lord of the World” will be accomplished through this Immaculate Virgin, Queen of the Church, Mother of God, Mary Most Holy. With each rosary, with each First Saturday of Reparation to her, we contribute to Satan’s ultimate demise.

No Pope since Fatima has followed the Queen of Heaven’s request. There is no such thing as ‘close enough’ when obeying God. After years of disobedience, the mind and conscience of the Popes was sufficiently darkened to allow Pope John XXIII to simply outright deny Our Lady’s requests in 1960, choosing instead to lock away the document (Third Secret). This breath-taking hubris was followed by the most disastrous decision in the history of the Church, i.e., to convene an Ecumenical Council that would define no doctrine, simply issue a deluge of vague and ambiguous documents.

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Designs of Mercy – Part IV, Jacinta’s Last Days

 

Today’s post honors Saint Jacinta of Fatima on the 100th anniversary of her death in Lisbon, Portugal. Saint Jacinta died as Our Lady of the Rosary had promised, alone in a hospital far from home and her loved ones, but comforted by Our Lady who cradled this pure soul in her own immaculate arms and carried her to be a beautiful flower, placed by her before the throne of Jesus, her one true Love.

Herein we chronicle the final stage in little Saint Jacinta’s brief life on earth. Our last post brought Jacinta’s life up til the end of July, 1918 with Jacinta suffering greatly from the lingering influenza, pleurisy and a large draining abscess in the side of her chest. The decision had been made –  Jacinta had no choice but must leave her family and Lúcia to be treated in yet another hospital. Frère Michel continues the narrative:

“Poor Holy Father! We must pray much for him!”

In the first few days of July, Mr. Marto took in his arms the emaciated body of his daughter, placed her as best he could upon his donkey, and conducted Jacinta to Vila Nova de Ourem. There the sick child was given intensive treatment, but with no result. During her two month stay at the hospital, Jacinta suffered much, and more than anything else she suffered from the cruel loneliness.

According to Sister Lúcia: ‘When her mother went to see her, she asked if she wanted anything. She told her that she wanted to see me. This was no easy matter for my aunt, but she took me with her at the first opportunity. As soon as Jacinta saw me, she joyfully threw her arms around me, and asked her mother to leave me with her while she went to do her shopping. Then I asked her if she was suffering a lot. ‘

‘Yes, I am. But I offer everything for sinners, and in reparation to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.’ Then, filled with enthusiasm, she spoke of Our Lord and Our Lady: ‘Oh, how much I love to suffer for love of Them, just to give Them pleasure! They greatly love those who suffer for the conversion of sinners.’

When two months passed and no improvement was noted, the hospital and doctors released Jacinta home to the care of her family. The abscess in her side was draining purulent infection and required care beyond her family’s ability.  Frère Michel’s account quotes two witnesses to that period to give us some insight into Jacinta’s pitiable state:

Continue reading “Designs of Mercy – Part IV, Jacinta’s Last Days”

Return to the Garden, 2020

 

Sacrilege, Outrage and Indifference

In her revelations, Anne Catherine Emmerich spoke poignantly of the suffering of Our Lord during His agony in the Garden. She witnessed the enemies of Christ attacking Him, heaping upon Him  “the most fearful outrages, cursing, striking, wounding, and tearing Him in pieces.and then explained that “these apparitions were all those persons who in divers ways insult and outrage Jesus, really and truly present in the Holy Sacrament.”

“I recognised among them all those who in any way profane the Blessed Eucharist . . . by neglect, irreverence, and omission of what was due to Him; by open contempt, abuse, and the most awful sacrileges; by the worship of worldly idols; by spiritual darkness and false knowledge; or finally, by error, incredulity, fanaticism, hatred, and open persecution.

Continue reading “Return to the Garden, 2020”

From Saint Thérèse for Lent

By request:

Among the beautiful works which have meant so much to me over the years are the writings of the great Carmelite saints. Last year, we offered the following from a small book called “Thoughts of the Servant of God Thérèse of the Child Jesus”, available through archive.org  (link).

 

On Faith

Life is passing, eternity draws nigh; soon shall we live the very life of God.

He whose Heart ever watches, taught me that while for a soul whose faith equals but a tiny grain of mustard seed, He works miracles, in order that this faith which is so weak may be fortified; yet for His intimate friends, for His Mother, He did not work miracles until He had put their faith to the test.

Did He not let Lazarus die though Martha and Mary had sent to tell Him that he was sick? At the marriage at Cana, the Blessed Virgin having asked Him to come to the assistance of the Master of the house, did He not reply that His hour was not yet come?  But after the trial, what a recompense! Water changed to wine, Lazarus restored to life. . . (Hist. d’une ame, Ch. VI)

 

~ ∞ ~ ∞ ~

The Lowest Place
The only thing not subject to be envied is the lowest place. It is therefore this lowest place alone which is without vanity and affliction of spirit. Still, the way of a man is not always in his power and sometimes we are surprised by a desire for that which glitters.  Then, let us take our place humbly amongst the imperfect, deeming ourselves little souls whom the good God must sustain at each moment.

As soon as He sees us truly convinced of our nothingness and we say to Him:  ‘My foot hath slipped: Thy mercy, O Lord, hath held me up.’ He stretches out His Hand to us; but if we will attempt to do something grand, even under pretext of zeal, He leaves us alone. It is enough therefore that we humble ourselves, and bear our imperfections with sweetness: there, for us, lies true sanctity.  (Counsels and Reminiscences) Continue reading “From Saint Thérèse for Lent”

Notes for the Time of Dry Wood

 

The release of the much hyped “Apostolic Exhortation” proves that once again, the man from Argentina has outsmarted his critics. For months now, we’ve been warned of the end of the celibate priesthood, women priests and so on. Then, when the Exhortation did not do as feared, we are all reassured that the Exhortation is the best possible document in this current pontificate. I recommend caution! How many times must they play this game? And will the faithful always be this gullible? Years ago, Rorate explained a particularly effective  Peronist tactic used by Bergoglio in his pre-Vatican days. He is his most avuncular, agreeable self precisely when he is most effectively undercutting his opposition.

Note this in ¶3:

“…I would like to officially present the Final Document, which sets forth the conclusions of the Synod, which profited from the participation of many people who know better than myself or the Roman Curia the problems and issues of the Amazon region, since they live there, they experience its suffering and they love it passionately. I have preferred not to cite the Final Document in this Exhortation, because I would encourage everyone to read it in full.

I have much to tell you about what this all really means but perhaps the words of another will be better understood; you really must take this to heart. Although most are deceived today by the fog of war, that is, the confusion  of the terrible combat being waged, the true children of Our Lady of the Rosary will understand this:

Continue reading “Notes for the Time of Dry Wood”

Saint Catherine of Siena and the Message of Fatima

 

The Dialogue of the Seraphic Virgin, St. Catherine of Siena has much to avail us in this current conflict: By reading it prayerfully, we come to understand the overwhelming need for charity to motivate our penances and prayers for sinners, especially our priests and bishops who have fallen into error, and many have lost the faith. Yet we are called to pray for them without ceasing.

How finite works are not sufficient for punishment or recompense without the perpetual affection of love.

Leave all to Him, let go of yourself.
Lose yourself on the cross, and you will find yourself entirely.

 

Then, the Eternal Truth seized and drew more strongly to Himself her desire, doing as He did in the Old Testament, for when the sacrifice was offered to God, a fire descended and drew to Him the sacrifice that was acceptable to Him; so did the sweet Truth to that soul, in sending down the fire of the clemency of the Holy Spirit, seizing the sacrifice of desire that she made of herself, saying:

“Do you not know, dear daughter, that all the sufferings, which the soul endures, or can endure, in this life, are insufficient to punish one smallest fault, because the offense, being done to Me, who am the Infinite Good, calls for an infinite satisfaction? However, I wish that you should know, that not all the pains that are given to men in this life are given as punishments, but as corrections, in order to chastise a son when he offends; though it is true that both the guilt and the penalty can be expiated by the desire of the soul, that is, by true contrition, not through the finite pain endured, but through the infinite desire; because God, who is infinite, wishes for infinite love and infinite grief. Infinite grief I wish from My creature in two ways:

    • in one way, through her sorrow for her own sins, which she has committed against Me her Creator;
    • in the other way, through her sorrow for the sins which she sees her neighbors commit against Me.

Of such as these, inasmuch as they have infinite desire, that is, are joined to Me by an affection of love, and therefore grieve when they offend Me, or see Me offended, their every pain, whether spiritual or corporeal, from wherever it may come, receives infinite merit, and satisfies for a guilt which deserved an infinite penalty, although their works are finite and done in finite time; but, inasmuch as they possess the virtue of desire, and sustain their suffering with desire, and contrition, and infinite displeasure against their guilt, their pain is held worthy. Paul explained this when he said: If I had the tongues of angels, and if I knew the things of the future and gave my body to be burned, and have not love, it would be worth nothing to me. The glorious Apostle thus shows that finite works are not valid, either as punishment or recompense, without the condiment of the affection of love.

Desire and Contrition

How desire and contrition of heart satisfies, both for the guilt and the penalty in oneself and in others; and how sometimes it satisfies for the guilt only, and not the penalty.

“I have shown you, dearest daughter, that the guilt is not punished in this finite time by any pain which is sustained purely as such. And I say, that the guilt is punished by the pain which is endured through the desire, love, and contrition of the heart; not by virtue of the pain, but by virtue of the desire of the soul; inasmuch as desire and every virtue is of value, and has life in itself, through Christ crucified, My only begotten Son, in so far as the soul has drawn her love from Him, and virtuously follows His virtues, that is, His Footprints.

In this way, and in no other, are virtues of value, and in this way, pains satisfy for the fault, by the sweet and intimate love acquired in the knowledge of My goodness, and in the bitterness and contrition of heart acquired by knowledge of one’s self and one’s own thoughts. And this knowledge generates a hatred and displeasure against sin, and against the soul’s own sensuality, through which, she deems herself worthy of pains and unworthy of reward.”

The sweet Truth continued:
Continue reading “Saint Catherine of Siena and the Message of Fatima”

A Miracle at Lourdes

Today, February 11th, we honor the first apparition of the Immaculate Conception to Bernadette of Lourdes. and so we offer today the following narrative of a remarkable cure at the Shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes;  it’s a favorite of our grandchildren and great-grandchildren and I hope you’ll like it too!

IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR

The first world war broke out in 1914, and Jack Traynor was mobilized with the Royal Naval Reserve, to which he belonged. He was in the naval brigade that took part in the unsuccessful Antwerp expedition of October, 1914, and was in the last battalion to retreat. He was carrying one of his officers to safety, when he was hit on the head by shrapnel. He did not regain consciousness until five weeks later, when he woke up after an operation in a Marine hospital in England. He recovered rapidly and went back into service.

In 1915, Traynor was lent to the 1st Dublin Fusiliers as physical instructor, and was a member of the expeditionary force sent to Egypt and the Dardanelles. On April 25th, 1915, he took part in the landing from the steamship River Clyde at Gallipoli. He was in charge of the first boat to leave the ship and was one of the few to reach the shore that day. From their positions in the steep banks above the beach the Turks raked the Clyde and the boats with deadly gunfire. The casualties were so heavy that the operation was suspended until nightfall.

Meanwhile all the officers in the landing parties had been killed, and Traynor found himself in charge of about 100 men, who took cover in a shallow trench. A Catholic chaplain, Father Finn, was killed in the second boat, from which he fell. Traynor dragged him from under the barbed wire and later he and his comrades buried him on shore. After dusk more officers and men landed, and the small force began to fight its way, with severe losses, up to the sand hills. For days the bitter fighting continued. Traynor took part, without injury, until May 8th, when he was hit by machine gun fire during a bayonet charge.

He seems to have been literally sprayed with bullets. He was wounded in the head and chest, while a bullet tore through the inner side of his upper right arm and lodged under the collar-bone. Medical corps men brought him back, dazed and suffering, to the beach, and he was shipped to the base hospital at Alexandria, Egypt. Now began his long years as an invalid and as the patient of unsuccessful operations. A well-known English surgeon, Sir Frederick Treves, operated on him in Alexandria, in an attempt to sew together the severed nerves in the upper arm, which the bullet wound had left paralysed and useless.

The attempt failed, and so did another, made by another surgeon, on the hospital ship that brought Traynor from Alexandria to England. In September, 1915, in the Haslar naval hospital, England. a third operation was performed with the same object-and the same result. While on the hospital ship Traynor suffered his first epileptic attack. These attacks became frequent.

INCURABLE

The surgeon-general of the navy now advised amputation of the paralysed arm, as there seemed to be no hope of ever joining the torn and shrunken nerves. Traynor would not consent. In November, 1916, another doctor tried to suture the nerves, bringing the number of unsuccessful operations up to four. By this time Traynor had been discharged from the service, first on 80 per cent pension, then on 100 per cent, as being permanently and completely disabled. He had to spend months in various hospitals as an epileptic patient.

Continue reading “A Miracle at Lourdes”