French laws no longer recognize the Creator . . .

“French laws no longer recognize the Creator, but the Creator will make Himself recognized and will visit her thrice with the rod of His wrath.”

Thank you all for your kind Easter thoughts and prayers. I hope your Easter was happy and very blessed! Readers ask for answers about the torching of Notre Dame and the prophecies we sometimes discuss here, especially that of St. John Bosco. A review:

Now, St. John Bosco’s prophecy about France, especially Paris, is a particularly helpful one, not just for Paris, or France, but for for the entire Bergoglian Reformed Church, which sadly no longer recognizes the Creator..

“War comes from the south, peace from the north. French laws no longer recognize the Creator, but the Creator will make Himself recognized and will visit her thrice with the rod of His wrath. In the first visit He breaks her pride by conquest, plundering ruined harvest and butchery of men and beasts.

“In the second visit the great Prostitute of Babylon, which makes decent people sigh and call it the Brothel of Europe, will be left without a leader and will be a victim of disorder. “Paris! Paris! Instead of arming yourself in the name of the Lord, you fortify yourself with Houses of Immorality. They will be destroyed by you yourself. Your idol, The Pantheon, will be burnt to ashes in order that this may come true: ‘violence uttereth lies against me.’ Your enemies will reduce you to want, to hunger, to fear, and will make you the abomination of the nations. Ah, woe to you, if you do not recognize the hand that strikes you! I want to punish immorality, the despising of and the contempt for My law, says the Lord. …

“In the third visit you will fall into the hands of foreigners. Your enemies standing afar off will behold your palaces in flames. Your homes will become a heap of ruins bathed with the blood of your heroes who are no more. But there will come a great warrior from the North carrying a banner and on the right hand that supports it is written: ‘The Irresistible Hand of the Lord. The days fly by, your years will reach the destined number; but the great Queen (Mary) will ever be your help, and as in times past so in the future She will always be the exceeding great fortress of the Church.” (. . . )

“The enemy of the good does not stand idle one moment…He will raise up enemies amongst my children. The powers of the world will belch forth fire,  (. . . ) Wherever you go, continue and bring to an end the work entrusted to you. The days fly by, your years will reach the destined number; but the great Queen (Blessed Virgin Mary) will ever be your help, and as in times past so in the future She will always be the exceeding great fortress of the Church.”  (From “The Prophets and Our Times, by Rev. Gerald Culleton, by KIC, Kindle Edition.) Note: I have excerpted the quotes, for the complete version, highly recommend! – please click on link.

A reasonable interpretation, in light of what we know now, would be:

The Saint refers to France in terms that might be used by the Old Testament prophets castigating the unfaithful of Israel, calling her “the great Prostitute of Babylon”  and “the Brothel of Europe”, both references to France unfaithful to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and become cold and indifferent to the faith.

“Instead of arming yourself in the name of the Lord, you fortify yourself with Houses of Immorality.”  That is, instead of arming themselves with the weapons given by Our Lady of Fatima, the faithless shepherds chose the treasonous path of surrender before the secular agenda of the Rulers of the World, the enemies of Christ and His Church.

St. John Bosco calls the churches of France, “Houses of Immorality”, and he warns that they, will be destroyed by you yourself. Your idol, The Pantheon, will be burnt to ashes in order that this may come true: ‘violence uttereth lies against me.’ Your enemies will reduce you to want, to hunger, to fear, and will make you the abomination of the nations.”  Refers to replacing the true evangelic mission of the Church with idolatrous liberalism, pantheistic ecumenism and sexual depravity. The Churchmen of France have allowed her churches to become stripped of their sacred character and become complicit in their prostitution as tourist traps debased to the leve of the Eiffel Tower and the Arc de Triomphe. “They will be destroyed by you yourself” is obvious. Long before the terrorist torching of Notre Dame, the Bishops themselves destroyed the structures of the faith they have abandoned.

“Ah, woe to you, if you do not recognize the hand that strikes you!”  Yes, woe to the cowardly Bishops who follow their pontiff, agreeing to “speak not a word” about the true enemies of Christ who continue to smite the Bride of Christ.

The” third visit” is self-explanatory,  you will fall into the hands of foreigners … the enemy will raise up enemies from amongst my children . . . the powers of the world will belch forth fire”At the end, Our Lady, as the Holy Ghost keeps reminding us, “will ever be your help, and as in times past so in the future She will always be the exceeding great fortress of the Church.”

There is another interesting prophecy, oddly enough, by a Jesuit from the 18th century, Father Nectou:

“When those things come to pass which will bring on the triumph of the Church, then will such confusion reign on earth that people will think God has permitted them to have their own contrary will and that the providence of God is not concerned about the world. The confusion will be so general that mankind will not be able to think aright, as if God had entirely withheld his providence from mankind, and that, during the worst crisis, the best that can be done would be to remain where God has placed us, and persevere in fervent prayer.

“Two parties will be formed in France which shall fight unto death. The party of evil will at first be stronger; the good side shall be weaker. At that time there shall be such a terrible crisis that people, frightened by events, shall believe that the end of the world is come. Blood shall flow in several large cities. The very elements shall be convulsed. It will be like a little general judgment. A great multitude of persons shall perish in these calamitous times.

“But the wicked shall never prevail. They indeed shall conspire for the destruction of the Church; but time shall not be allowed them, because this frightful crisis shall be of a short duration. When all will be considered lost, all shall be found safe. During this revolution, which shall very likely be general, and not confined to France, Paris shall be destroyed so completely that, twenty years afterwards, fathers walking over its ruins with their children, these will inquire what place that was. To whom they will answer: “My child, this was formerly a great city, which God has destroyed on account of her crimes.”

“Paris shall certainly be destroyed, but before this occurs, such signs and portents shall be observed, that all good people will be induced to fly away from it. After this most terrible event, everything shall return to order; justice shall reign in the world, and the counter-revolution shall be accomplished. The triumph of the Church will then be so complete that nothing like it shall ever be seen, for this will be the last victory of the Church upon earth. Those persons who shall behold this last revolution will thank God for having preserved them to witness this glorious triumph of the Church.” (This prophecy as well is from the book cited above.)

Note that Father Nectou foresees a confusion that “will be so general that mankind will not be able to think aright, as if God had entirely withheld His providence from mankind,”  That reminds me of what Father Malachi Martin said to us about the Third Secret.

The most intriguing portion of Father Nectou’s prophecy is the little vignette he offers, of a father telling his son about the the devastated city of Paris, My child, this was formerly a great city, which God has destroyed on account of her crimes.”

This need not be! Whether she is honored as Our Lady of Paris, or Our Lady of Fatima, she will bring the victory for she is truly, “the exceeding great fortress of the Church.”

Pray the Rosary !

  Immaculate Heart of Mary, Queen of our hearts, Mother of the Church, do thou offer to the Eternal Father the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, for the conversion of poor sinners, especially our Pontiff.
  Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Thy kingdom come! Viva Cristo Rey!
†  O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee..
†  St. Joseph, protect us, protect our families, protect our priests.
†  St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.

Please pray for the Consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary!

~ by evensong for love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ, King.
Vouchsafe that I may praise thee, O Sacred Virgin! Give me strength against thine enemies!

The Resurrection and the Life, 2019

The Resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ

21 April, 2019

“I am the Resurrection and the Life; he that believeth in Me, although he be dead, shall live.” (John 11, 25).

“Joy in truth: for only sincere and upright souls who seek the truth lovingly and still more, ‘do the truth’ can fully rejoice in the Resurrection. We are sincere when we recognize ourselves for what we are, with all our faults, deficiencies and need for conversion. From this knowledge of our miseries comes the sincere resolve to purify ourselves … in order to be renewed in the risen Christ.

“Noli Me tangere.”

 

“Truth, however, must be accomplished in charity — veritatem facientes in caritatem, doing the truth in charity. (Eph. 4, 15). Therefore the Postcommunion prayer that is placed on our lips is more timely than ever: ‘Pour forth upon us, O Lord, the Spirit of Thy love, to make us of one heart.’ Without unity and mutual charity there can be no real Paschal joy. (Divine Intimacy, p. 419-420).

On that first Easter morning, we see the penitent, Mary Magdalen,  weeping and searching for the Master. She found His tomb empty and thus began her sorrowful efforts to find Him and tend lovingly to His Remains. Blinded by her tears and grief, she failed to recognise Him when He stood nearby.  She was expecting death, but here was Life! He spoke but one word, her name, (for He knows His own by name) pronounced with such infinite mercy, she was transformed by joy. Like Peter at the Lord’s Transfiguration, she responded in a wholly human way. ‘Master!’ And yet her urge to clasp His refound humanity was gently rebuffed.

‘Noli me tangere.‘ Do not touch me yet! For He must go to His Father. And we too, must respond to this Passion, Death and Resurrection by following Him.  With Him, we turn towards Our Father, rejoicing in truth and in love. We too have rolled away the stone of our past, our sins, our indifference; we too have seen the empty tomb.  For now, we see the sepulchre  in the great rock of the Church: it is empty! And pagans stand guard as once they did. We too, seek Him, weeping.

But He is risen! He goes to the Father.

And we go with Him! Alleluia! Alleluia! Alleluia!

A brief explanation for readers who question the last three lines above, that is,  “For now, we see the sepulchre  in the great rock of the Church: it is empty! And pagans stand guard as once they did. We too, seek Him, weeping.”:

Please see in a previous post, (The Auto-demolition of the Church)  the quotation from Pope Pius XII,  “A day will come when the civilized world will deny its God, when the Church will doubt as Peter doubted. She will be tempted to believe that man has become God. In our churches, Christians will search in vain for the red lamp where God awaits them. Like Mary Magdalene, weeping before the empty tomb, they will ask, ‘Where have they taken Him?'”

If you, like I do, feel somewhat challenged to rejoice when we see everywhere our dear Jesus so rejected despite His loving sacrifices, His generous mercies to us, let’s remind ourselves of Saint Therese the Little Flower and not let Him see our tears, but rejoice with Him as we commemorate His victory, and rejoice today, for we trust in Him Who is our only joy!

Beloved readers, I pray your Easter is blessed and peaceful. Thank you for your prayers and good wishes, and also, thank you for reading – and sharing! our posts.

  Immaculate Heart of Mary, Queen of our hearts, Mother of the Church, do thou offer to the Eternal Father the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, for the conversion of poor sinners, especially our Pontiff.

  Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Thy kingdom come! Viva Cristo Rey!

  O Mary conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee!.

  St. Joseph, protect us, protect our families, protect our priests.

  St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.

Please pray the Rosary – so many souls depend on it!

~ by evensong for love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ, King.
Vouchsafe that I may praise thee, O Sacred Virgin! Give me strength against thine enemies!

 

Father Groenings on the Crucifixion, 2019

Sorry if I have given you too many posts, but could not let this most holy day pass without our most loved Good Friday post. Again from Father Groenings:

The Crucifixion and Death of the Savior

Today, we examine three events which occurred at the time of Our Lord’s Crucifixion. The miraculous sign of the total eclipse, the rending of the Temple veil and the earthquake. These thoughts are largely drawn from the writings of Father Groenings, S. J.

The Total Eclipse of the Sun
This eclipse of the sun was not a natural one. It was miraculous in every respect and that for these reasons: First it occurred at the time of the full moon. For this Friday was the day when, according to the Law, the Pasch should be celebrated, and this feast always occurred at the time of the full moon. Now, naturally, an eclipse of the sun can occur only at the time of the new moon, when the latter is between the sun and the earth.

Then, it was miraculous because it was total from the very beginning.  Lastly, because it remained total for three hours. In an ordinary eclipse of the sun, the moon, in the beginning, covers only a part of the sun, then gradually more, until the darkness reaches its greatest height, whereupon it again gradually decreases.

This eclipse of the sun was, therefore, an extraordinary work of God, and the Holy Fathers freely apply to it the words of the prophet Amos, “And it shall come to pass in that day that the sun shall go down at mid-day, and I will make the earth dark in the day of light.”

Continue reading “Father Groenings on the Crucifixion, 2019”

I will not leave you orphans

 

“I will not leave you orphans”

The Litany of His Love, with our prayers for you this Lent.

The term litany is derived from the Greek word for prayer, entreaty or supplication. The post-conciliar Church tends to disdain litanies as repetitious but faithful Catholics know them for what they are, sweet words of love exchanged between the Beloved and His own. On Holy Thursday evening during the time He instituted His sacrament of love, Our Lord spoke tenderly, pleading with His loved ones (and by them, us!) to understand this new law of love. See how often, in varied ways, He reminds us of His love for us and the sweet burden we share for the salvation of souls.

Continue reading “I will not leave you orphans”

The Seven Last Words, VII

The Seventh and Last Word:

THE SEVENTH WORD

“Father, into Thy hands I commend My spirit.”

He has cried with a loud voice, and the rocks have rent to its echo, and the earth is shaken, and the Veil of the Old Testament is torn from top to bottom as the Old Covenant passes into the New and the enclosed sanctity of the Most Holy Place breaks out into the world. And now, as the level sun shines out again beneath the pall of clouds, He whispers, as at Mary’s knee in Nazareth, the old childish prayer and yields up His spirit into His Father’s hands.

The last Paradox, then, is uttered. He Who saves others cannot save Himself! The Shepherd of souls relinquishes His own. For, as we cannot save our lives unless we lose them for His sake, so He too cannot save them unless He loses His for our sake.

Continue reading “The Seven Last Words, VII”

The Seven Last Words, Part VI

Continuing the Lenten Sermon of Msgr. Robert Hugh Benson, Part VI

THE SIXTH WORD

“It is consummated.”

He has finished His “Father’s business,” He has dealt with sinners and saints, and has finally disclosed to us the secrets of the Soul and the Body of His that are the hope of both sinners and saints alike. And there is no more for Him to do.

An entirely new Beginning, then, is at hand, now that the Last Sabbath is come — the Last Sabbath, so much greater than the First as Redemption is greater than Creation. For Creation is a mere introduction to the Book of Life; it is the arrangement of materials that are to be thrown instantly into confusion again by man, who should be its crown and master. The Old Testament is one medley of mistakes and fragments and broken promises and violated treaties, to reach its climax in the capital Mistake of Calvary, when men indeed “knew not what they did.” And even God Himself in the New Testament, as man in the Old, has gone down in the catastrophe and hangs here mutilated and broken. Real life, then, is now to begin.

Yet, strangely enough, He calls it an End rather than a Beginning. “Consummatum est!”

Continue reading “The Seven Last Words, Part VI”

The Seven Last Words, IV and V

Continuing Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson’s Lenten sermon, “The Seven Last Words”, Parts IV & V

THE FOURTH WORD

“My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?”

Our Blessed Lord in the revelation He makes from the Cross passes gradually inwards to Himself Who is its centre. He begins in the outermost circle of all, with the ignorant sinners. He next deals with the one sinner who ceased to be ignorant, and next with those who were always nearest to Himself, and now at last He reveals the deepest secret of all. This is the central Word of the Seven in every sense. There is no need to draw attention to the Paradox it expresses.

I. First, then, let us remind ourselves of the revealed dogma that Jesus Christ was the Eternal Son of the Father; that He dwelt always in the Bosom of that Father; that when He left heaven, He did not leave the Father’s side; that at Bethlehem and Nazareth and Galilee and Jerusalem and Gethsemane and Calvary He was always the Word that was with God and the Word that was God. Next, that the eyes even of His Sacred Humanity looked always and continuously upon the Face of God, since His union with God was entire and complete: as He looked up into His Mother’s face from the manger, He saw behind it the Face of His Father; as He cried in Gethsemane, “If it be possible”, even in His Sacred Humanity He knew that it could not be; as He groaned out on Calvary that God had forsaken Him, He yet looked without one instant’s intermission into the glory of heaven and saw His Father there.

Continue reading “The Seven Last Words, IV and V”

The Seven Last Words, III

Continuing from Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson’s Lenten Sermon on the Seven Last Words of Christ Our Lord, Part III, from “Paradoxes of Catholicism”.

THE THIRD WORD

“Woman, behold thy son. Behold thy mother”

Our Divine Lord now turns, from the soul who at one bound has sprung into the front rank, to those two souls who have never left it, and supremely to that Mother on whose soul sin has never yet breathed, on whose breast Incarnate God had rested as inviolate and secure as on the Bosom of the Eternal Father, that Mother who was His Heaven on earth. Standing beside her is the one human being who is least unworthy to be there, now that Joseph has passed to his reward and John the Baptist has gone to join the Prophets — “the disciple whom Jesus loved”, who had lain on the breast of Jesus as Jesus had lain on the breast of Mary.

Our Lord has just shown how He deals with His dear sinners; now He shows how He will “be glorified with His Saints”. The Paradox of this Word is that Death, the divider of those who are separated from God, is the bond of union between those that are united to Him.

Continue reading “The Seven Last Words, III”

The Seven Last Words, II

Continuing Monsignor Benson’s “Seven Last Words”, Part II

THE SECOND WORD

Amen I say to thee, this day thou shalt be with Me in Paradise.”

Our Divine Lord, in this Second Word, immediately applies and illustrates the First and drives its lesson home. He shows us how the rain of mercy that poured out of heaven in answer to the prayer He made just now enlightens the man who, above all others present on Calvary, was the most abjectly ignorant of all; the man who, himself at the very heart of the tragedy, understood it less, probably, than the smallest child on the outskirts of the crowd.

His life had been one long defiance of the laws of both God and man. He had been a member of one of those troops of human vermin that crawl round Jerusalem, raiding solitary houses, attacking solitary travellers, guilty of sins at once the bloodiest and the meanest, comparable only to the French apaches of our own day. Well, he had been gripped at last by the Roman machine, caught in some sordid adventure, and here, resentful and furious and contemptuous, full of bravado and terror, he snarled like a polecat at every human face he saw, snarled and spat at the Divine Face Itself that looked at him from a cross that was like his own; and, since he had not even a spark of the honour that is reputed to exist among thieves, taunted his fellow criminal for the folly of His crime.

Continue reading “The Seven Last Words, II”

The Seven Sorrows of the Immaculata, Lent, 2019

 

Today, April 12, is the Commemoration of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary. “Now there stood by the Cross of Jesus, His Mother.” St. John, 19, 35. The Church in her wisdom recalls us to this most salutary devotion twice each year, in April and again in September.

However, it does us absolutely no good to commemorate these seven sorrows if we fail to correlate them with the magnitude of sin, for make no mistake, these sorrows, like Our Lord’s own sorrows, are the result of the outrage of sin; an outrage against God’s justice. Although the world, — and this horrid, worldly church which has eclipsed the true church — refuses to consider God’s Justice, it is offended greatly and Our Blessed Mother and Our Lord Jesus Christ are bearing the tremendous burden of suffering for the sorrows we, ourselves refuse to bear.

Father Gabriel reminds us that although Mary’s grief was immeasurable, it was surpassed by her love, “a love so great that it could encompass that vast sea of sorrow.” (Divine Intimacy).

The Seven Sorrows of Mary
Prophecy of Simeon And after the days of her purification, according to the law of Moses, were accomplished, they carried Him to Jerusalem, to present Him to the Lord And behold there was a man in Jerusalem named Simeon, and this man was just and devout, waiting for the consolation of Israel; and the Holy Ghost was in him… And Simeon blessed them, and said to Mary his mother: Behold this Child is set for the fall and for the resurrection of many in Israel, and for a sign which shall be contradicted; And thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that, out of many hearts, thoughts may be revealed. (Luke 2, 25-35)

Continue reading “The Seven Sorrows of the Immaculata, Lent, 2019”