The Fog of War

Post updated, see bottom of post re rumors about Pope Benedict.

Cognitive dissonance and diabolical disorientation. When truth is treason and faith is … heresy?

What are we to think of these times? We have sodomite prelates masquerading as profound theologians, and two manifestly separate individuals who we are assured constitute together one papal office.

The latest tempest has been regarding the possibility of a “Papal Diarchy” or as the Remnant’s Chris Jackson termed it, the “Two-Headed Pope”.  As elsewhere noted, Antonio Socci and Vittorio Messori wrote on this in early 2014. Our previous posts regarding this subject were “The Suffering Pope?”  in February 2014  and  “Abomination”  in July, 2014. However, the last post we had on the subject was Professor Roberto de Mattei’s rebuttal in Sandro Magister’s site Chiesa, which we cross-posted in  “One Pope”  in September, 2014.

The two popes ?
“Poor Holy Father, we must pray for him!” (Blessed Jacinta)

In that post, Dr. de Mattei rebuts Fr. Stefano Violi and Professor Valerio Gigliotti, both progressivists who have publicly supported the institutionalization of the “Pope Emeritus”, that is the concept that the Petrine ministry may be separated into two functions, one spiritual and one administrative.  Dr. de Mattei writes of the positions of Violi and Gigliotti regarding Pope Benedict’s resignation:

“His powers,” Violi writes, “seem to him insufficient for the administration of the ‘munus,’ not for the ‘munus’ itself.” Proof of the spiritual essence of the “munus” is taken as having been expressed in the following words of the “Declaratio” of Benedict XVI:

“I am well aware that this ministry (munus), due to its essential spiritual nature, must be carried out (exequendum) not only with words and deeds, but no less with prayer and suffering.”

In this passage, according to Violi, Benedict XVI distinguishes not only between “munus” and “executio muneris,” but also between an administrative-ministerial “executio,” carried out in actions and words (“agendo et loquendo”), and an “executio” that is expressed with prayer and suffering (“orando et patiendo”). Benedict XVI is seen as having were announced the active exercise of the ministry, but not the office, the “munus” of the papacy: “The object of the irrevocable resignation is in fact the ‘executio muneris’ through action and word (‘agendo et loquendo’), not the ‘munus’ entrusted to him once and for all.”

Gigliotti also maintains that Benedict XVI, in ceasing to be supreme pontiff, has taken on a new juridical and personal status.

The split between the traditional attribute of “potestas” and the new one of “servitium,” between the juridical and spiritual dimensions of the papacy, is claimed to have opened the way “to a new mystical dimension of service to the people of God in communion and charity.” The “plenitudo potestatis” would be left behind for a “plenitudo caritatis” of the pope emeritus: a third status “with respect both to the condition prior to elevation to the see of Peter and to that of the supreme leadership of the Church: it is the ‘third embodiment of the pope,’ that of operative continuity in the service of the Church through the contemplative way.” * * *

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