The Transfiguration, 2017

Nisi Solum Jesum

Today, August 6th, the Church recalls to us the Transfiguration of Our Lord Jesus Christ, which is also the subject for the Second Sunday in Lent. However, now in the heat of August, there is a slight difference. Today’s epistle is from St. Peter, the first Vicar of Christ. Despite his flaws, Our Lord chose him to lead His fledgling Church. What does St. Peter tell us in today’s epistle?

“Dearly beloved, we have not followed artificial fables, when we made known to you the power and presence of Our Lord Jesus Christ; but having been made eyewitnesses of His greatness. For He received from God the Father honour and glory; this voice coming down to Him from the excellent glory: ‘This is My beloved Son in Whom I am well pleased, Hear ye Him.’ And this voice we heard brought from heaven when we were with Him on the holy mount. And we have the more firm prophetical word, whereunto you do well to attend, as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star rise in your hearts.” (II Peter, 1, 16-19)

Thus, today’s epistle reminds us that the Word of God is no fantastic fable, it is a true history of actual historical occurrences. As our first Pontiff reminds us, we “do well to attend, as to a light that shines in a dark place, until the day dawn and the day-star rise in (our) hearts.”

And so, we move to the glorious moment of the Transfiguration itself. Jesus took Peter, James and John up on Mount Tabor and revealed to them the very slightest bit of His infinite glory for a few brief moments in order to confirm their faith; knowing as He did, that the events of His passion were to shake their faith utterly.

Nisi solum Jesum

“His face did shine as the sun and His garments became white as snow.” (Matthew 17, 2) In this vision the Apostles saw Moses and Elias speaking with Jesus. St. Luke tells us that, “they spoke of His decease that He should accomplish in Jerusalem”. (Luke 9, 31) By placing the Transfiguration narrative in this timeframe, the Church wishes to illustrate the close connection between the Transfiguration and the Passion and Death of Jesus. By revealing this brief glimpse of His glory, Jesus was showing His Apostles that it was impossible for Him as well as for them to reach the full glory of the Transfiguration without passing through suffering. After the Resurrection, He would confirm that lesson as He met them at Emmaus, “Ought not Christ to have suffered these things and so to enter into His glory?” (Luke 24, 26).

Peter, ever the impetuous one, became so caught up in the rapture of the moment, that he cried out, “It is good for us to be here!”. And then he offered to make three tabernacles, one each for Jesus, Moses and Elias, but as he was speaking the Lord God interrupted him peremptorily, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. Hear ye Him!”

There is much to learn from this gospel. Peter was understandably impressed with the splendor of the moment and strongly desired to remain right there, in such a spiritually satisfying place. His response was so typical of us: How many times have we responded to an influx of grace with a new spurt of “busy-work”, bustling around like Martha instead of allowing ourselves to be absorbed in Jesus alone! But if Peter had done as he wished, that would have been to miss the whole point of it, which was to prepare them for the immense scandal of the Passion, the terrible spectacle of their Master humbled even to the lowest imaginable specter of a common criminal, mocked and spit upon, stripped of all dignity and nailed to a cross to die in ignominy.

And so, God by His reply told Peter firmly to listen to Jesus and follow Him. if Peter was to lead the Church, he must learn to follow Christ all the way to Golgotha, up to the place of the skull. In time, he must even follow Him to his own crucifixion. Father Gabriel in his meditations on the Transfiguration assures us, “God does not console us for our entertainment but rather for our encouragement, for our strengthening, for the increase in our generosity in suffering for love of Him.” (Divine Intimacy)

Abruptly, the glorious vision ended, “And they lifting up their eyes saw no one but only Jesus.” In the Vulgate, “Levantes autem oculos suos, neminem viderunt, nisi solum Jesum.” (Matthew 17, 8). Nisi solum Jesum, with Jesus alone, they came down from the mountain. Nisi solum Jesum, Jesus alone is sufficient for us. Everything else, even friends, family, encouragement, approval, may be stripped away; yet Jesus alone remains. If He in His wisdom withdraws all else, yet He abides with us, even when we “know Him not”. And we must affirm this, even though He choose for us to follow Him through His suffering, being faithful even unto the awful moment when we cry out in our soul’s desolation, “My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me?”

Not as the world gives, does Jesus give. When it seems to the soul that He has withdrawn His love, withdrawn all consolation, it is only so that we follow Him with love and absolute trust as He endures the darkness of His Passion in order that He may bring about the glory of His true and lasting Transfiguration and share His glory with us eternally. This is as true for the Church as it is for us personally.

We are now  only months away from the October culmination of the Visits of Our Lady of the Rosary at Fatima in 1917. On this memorable occasion of the Centenary of Fatima, Pope Bergoglio is  planning to honor another anniversary, that of the arch-heretic Martin Luther who ripped so many hapless souls away from the Church and swept them down with him to eternal damnation. Why on earth would a Catholic, much less the man who presents himself to the world as the very Vicar of Christ on earth, why would he honor such a man?

We know that no matter what the media, even the supposedly Catholic media report, the Bergoglio/Kasper/Danneels agenda  is hell-bent on achieving irreversible change in the practice of the faith. But we know without a doubt that Our Lord Jesus Christ will not forsake His Church. Let us hold firm to the faith, as St. Peter tells us,

“attend,  as to a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star rise in our hearts.”

Just as the Transfiguration was only a momentary glimpse of His glory, so too the passion and death of Our Lord in His Mystical Body the Church, are destined to pass and yield to His glorious Resurrection. Let us keep our perspective then, even in these chaotic times, and abide “with Jesus alone”, “Nisi solum Jesum”  accepting all that is given to us from His wounded hands, trusting in Jesus alone.

Pray the Rosary with confidence and joy!
  Immaculate Heart of Mary, Queen of our hearts, Mother of the Church, do thou offer to the Eternal Father the Precious Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ, for the conversion of poor sinners, especially our Pontiff.
  Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Thy kingdom come! Viva Cristo Rey!
  Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray for us now and at the hour of our death.
  St. Joseph, protect us, protect our families, protect our priests.
  St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle.

Please pray for the Consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary!

~ by evensong for love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ, King.

Vouchsafe that I may praise thee, O Sacred Virgin! Give me strength against thine enemies!

© All Content Copyright 2013-2017 ReturntoFatima.org. All Rights Reserved.

Bergoglio’s Reformation

Pope Francis forges ahead with the Bergoglian Reformation and knowing that he has but little time, is filled with evil intensity to rehabilitate the arch-heretic Martin Luther.

 

The Bergoglian Revolution

Just a few days ago, Pope Francis honored the 99th anniversary of Our Lady of the Rosary’s last visit to Fatima, Portugal and her Miracle of the Sun, which she performed “so that all will believe”. 

Oh wait – no – he honored someone else, didn’t he? Someone much more modern and important? Pope Francis chose to honor Martin Luther instead of the Blessed Virgin on the 99th anniversary of her miracle of the sun. Really. In fact, he did not even mention Our Lady of Fatima or the Holy Rosary once on the 99th anniversary of the greatest event of the 20th century.

To the left,  Pope Francis with the statue of Martin Luther, who was honored by the Pope during his talk welcoming Lutheran pilgrims on October 13, this year.

In his own words:

“The last thing you must do is ‘to say, to convince’. It’s not right to convince someone of your faith,” he said. “Proselytism is the strongest venom against the path of ecumenism”.

The pope was speaking to around 1,000 pilgrims in the Vatican – most of them German Lutherans – who are in Rome as part of ecumenical preparations for the 500th anniversary of the beginning of the Lutheran “reformation”.

“The Apostle Paul tells us that, by virtue of our baptism, we all form the one Body of Christ,” the pope said. “The different members, in fact, are one body.” (ANSA)

 Earlier, in yet another of his flying circus press conferences, on June 27, the Pope said,

I think that the intentions of Martin Luther were not mistaken. He was a reformer. Perhaps some methods were not correct . . . There was corruption in the Church, there was worldliness, attachment to money, to power, and this he protested. Then he was intelligent and took some steps forward justifying, and because he did this. And today Lutherans and Catholics, Protestants, all of us agree on the doctrine of justification.(NCRegister) Thus does this pope reject the “outdated” Council of Trent and its truths.

The “Luther Love Fest” will continue in a couple weeks, with the Pope visiting Sweden to honor Martin Luther there as well. And on it goes, where it stops no one knows. But we can take a fairly well informed guess that it will have its culmination by the time of the 500th anniversary of Luther’s revolt, in October 2017. No wonder the Pope is so fond of Luther: after all, Luther made a mess just as Pope Francis commands us. In fact, long before Luther, his patron demon Judas was notably making quite a mess and revolting against Christ;  perhaps the Pope will rehabilitate them both in this brave new church where heresy and betrayal is celebrated and speaking the truth of the faith is considered “venomous poison”.

Continue reading “Bergoglio’s Reformation”

The Wrath of the Lamb II

The term, “Wrath of the Lamb” indicates a severe judgment on prelates for Eucharistic abuses. It indicates a fearsome reprisal for those who desecrate the Eucharist, not merely the laymen, but particularly the hierarchy to whom Our Lord has entrusted His Sacred Mysteries and who shamelessly betray Him.

All three installments of “With Burning Concern: We Accuse Pope Francis” are online at Catholic Family News. It’s a very skillfully compiled summary of the most serious errors being pushed by the Bergoglian Reformation against the Church. It’s a tragic sign of the darkness of these days that there has not been one single prelate to speak out as clearly and bravely as Michael Matt, Chris Ferrara and John Vennari, and we pray that their message will reach all of the faithful throughout the world. Please download all three parts and help spread them.

Since I am unfortunately unable to post at present, I offer an earlier post which addresses the alarming heterodoxy flourishing in this Bergoglian Reformation:

The Wrath of the Lamb 

“And they say to the mountains and the rocks, ‘Fall upon us, and hide us from the face of Him that sitteth upon the throne and from the wrath of the Lamb.”

Far from being frightening, the above verse is meant to be a consolation. Indeed, the entire Apocalypse is God’s gift of consolation to Christians who are perennially in danger of being swept up in the maelstrom of the spiritual battle to destroy the Church.

Like the Apocalypse, all Our Lady’s appearances since  Luther began the Age of Apostasy are consistent; they warn against offending God, and promise His true, unfailing mercy to His faithful children. Now that we have a truly hellish situation, an apostate pope and a weak and faithless hierarchy unable or unwilling to confront him or otherwise defend the faith, we look to the Apocalypse and to the Messages of Our Immaculate Mother, to seek guidance and consolation.

Do you remember Father Amorth’s warning that unless the Pope and Bishops obeyed Our Lady of Fatima and consecrated Russia in October, the Chastisement would begin in earnest? I cannot say it more clearly than this: This is what the spiritual chastisement of the Church is. It is here now. You have the Pope and the Bishops extolling the “virtues” of Martin Luther, the vulgar and despicable heresiarch. For the Pope to laud Luther is to mock Our Lord Himself, to kick Him as He falls beneath this heavy cross.

To those who are paying attention, this is a terrifying time, as we await the denouement that is looming ever larger. These times are both surpassingly sad, and frightening. We know that the arrogant misuse of the teaching authority of the Church will bring, in God’s own time, His justice. In St. John’s Apocalypse, this is referred to as the “Wrath of the Lamb”. In Father Herman Kramer’s “Book of Destiny“, of Apocalypse, Chapter 6, verses 15-17, we read:

Continue reading “The Wrath of the Lamb II”