A Victory and a Tragedy

 

Today, we mark two anniversaries; the first a glorious victory of the faith through martyrdom. The second, a tragic loss through the betrayal of a modernist pope. On 17 July, 1794, the sixteen virgin martyrs of Compiegne gave their lives for the true faith. And also, on the day of infamy 17 July, 1967, the pathetic Pope Paul VI betrayed the faith by abolishing the Oath Against Modernism which had been placed as a bulwark against the rising tide of heresy in the Church, thus allowing the flood of modernism which has so ravaged the faith in these past 51 years.

On this day, 17 July, in 1794, the Holy, Roman Catholic Church gained 16 Virgin Martyrs, the Discalced Carmelites of Compiegne, victims of the Masonic Revolution in France. These brave and pure women, by their holy sacrifice purchased the end of the bloody tide of public beheadings. Although the public display of gory beheadings had run its course, the Satanic Revolution has, in various forms, continued on up to the present time.  We do well to heed the example of these brave martyrs, for we may sooner or later be called upon to defend the faith ourselves.

Holy Martyrs of Compeigne, pray for us!
Rekindle our ardor, our bodies are the Lord’s,
We climb, we climb the scaffold and give ourselves back to the Victor.

THE SIXTEEN CARMELITE MARTYRS OF COMPIEGNE

The French Revolution reveals the titanic struggle between good and evil. During the terror, over 40,000 Frenchmen were executed just for holding fast to the Catholic Faith and objecting to the worst excesses of the Committee of Public Safety. The blood lost in the years of 1792-1794 staggers the imagination even in the retelling and the campaign against the Church was as diabolical as it was cruel.

Contemplative religious communities had been among the first targets of the fury of the French Revolution against the Catholic Church. Less than a year from May 1789 when the Revolution began with the meeting of the Estates-General, these communities had been required by law to disband. But many of them continued in being, in hiding. Among these were the community of the Carmelite nuns of Compiegne, in northeastern France not far from Paris — the fifty-third convent in France of the Carmelite sisters who followed the reform of St. Teresa of Avila, founded in 1641, noted throughout its history for fidelity and fervor. Their convent was raided in August 1790, all the property of the sisters was seized by the government, and they were forced to discard their habits and leave their house. They divided into four groups which found lodging in four different houses all near the same church in Compiegne, and for several years they were to a large extent able to continue their religious life in secret. But the intensified surveillance and searches of the “Great Terror” revealed their secret, and in June 1794 most of them were arrested and imprisoned.

They had expected this; indeed, they had prayed for it. At some time during the summer of 1792, very likely just after the events of August 10 of that year that marked the descent into the true deeps of the Revolution, their prioress, Madeleine Lidoine, whose name in religion was Teresa in honor of the founder of their order, had foreseen much of what was to come. At Easter of 1792, she told her community that, while looking through the archives she had found the account of a dream a Carmelite had in 1693. In that dream, the Sister saw the whole Community, with the exception of 2 or 3 Sisters, in glory and called to follow the Lamb. In the mind of the Prioress, this meant martyrdom and might well be a prophetic announcement of their fate.

Mother Teresa had said to her sisters: “Having meditated much on this subject, I have thought of making an act of consecration by which the Community would offer itself as a sacrifice to appease the anger of God, so that the divine peace of His Dear Son would be brought into the world, returned to the Church and the state.” The sisters discussed her proposal and when the news of the September massacres came, mingling glorious martyrdom with apostasy, the community made their offering. In July, 1794 it was to be accepted.

After their lodgings were invaded again in June, their devotional objects shattered and their tabernacle trampled underfoot by a Revolutionary who told them that their place of worship should be transformed into a dog kennel, the Carmelite sisters were taken to the Conciergerie prison, where so many of the leading victims of the guillotine had been held during their last days on earth. There they composed a canticle for their martyrdom, to be sung to the familiar tune of the Marseillaise. The original still exists, written in pencil and given to one of their fellow prisoners, a lay woman who survived.

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The Oath Against Modernism

In view of the threat to the Faith posed by those in the hierarchy who are determined to irreversibly change the practice of our Faith, we repost one of our site’s most visited posts on Pope St. Pius X’s Oath Against Modernism.

Pope St. Pius X, promulgated the Oath Against Modernism in his Moto Proprio Sacrorum Antistitum on September 1, 1910 to prevent the heresy of modernism from corrupting and subverting the Church. Three years previously, in 1907, St. Pius X has issued his Holy Office Decree “Lamentabili  sane”  and  his encyclical “Pascendi Domenici gregis”  condemning the heresy of modernism. And yet, the modernists continued blatantly defiying him. Thus the need for the Moto Proprio Sacrorum Antistitum and its Oath Against Modernism.

Every pope from 1910 onwards had taken the oath, even the post-conciliar popes. Paul VI, who had sworn the Oath not only broke his solemn vow but abolished the Oath Against Modernism, allowing the heresy free reign through the Church after Vatican II. Pope Francis, as our first truly post-conciliar pope never took the Oath Against Modernism.

In his Moto Proprio Sacrorum Antistitum, Pope St. Pius X prefaced the Oath with this brief explanation:

It seems to Us that it has been ignored by none of the holy Bishops that the class of men, the modernists, whose personality was described in the encyclical letter Pascendi Dominici Gregis, have not refrained from working in order to disturb the peace of the Church. They have not ceased to attract followers, either, by forming a clandestine group; by these means, they inject in the very veins of the Christian Republic the virus of their doctrine, by editing books and publishing articles in anonymity or with pseudonyms. By reading anew Our aforementioned letter, and considering it carefully, it is clearly seen that this deliberate movement is the work of the men that we described in it, enemies that are the more dangerous the closer they are; that abuse their ministry by offering poisoned nourishment and by surprising the less cautious; by handing a false doctrine in which the sum of all errors is enclosed.

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St. Pius X and the Oath Against Modernism

St. Pius X was the last Pope who stood steadfast against the Modernist heresy. In his honor, here is his Oath Against Modernism, which was promulgated on September 1, 1910.  As you read it, please consider that every single Conciliar Pope from John XXIII through Benedict XVI had originally sworn this solemn oath, which of course, was violated by those same popes during and after Vatican II.

THE OATH AGAINST MODERNISM

To be sworn to by all clergy, pastors, confessors, preachers, religious superiors, and professors in philosophical-theological seminaries.

“I . . . . firmly embrace and accept each and every definition that has been set forth and declared by the unerring teaching authority of the Church, especially those principal truths which are directly opposed to the errors of this day.  Continue reading “St. Pius X and the Oath Against Modernism”