The Seven Last Words, I

From Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson’s Lenten Sermon on the Seven Last Words of Christ Our Lord, given about a century ago. This is Part I.

Msgr. Benson’s sermon excellent antidote to the poisonous false mercy of the modernists who have assumed control of Christ’s Church. The Passion and Death of Jesus Christ is a stark reminder that God hates sin so much His only begotten Son suffered and died to expiate the dreadful stain of it – in order that we might become children of God and heirs to the Kingdom.

And yet, look at the appalling indifference all around! Have all forsaken Him?

THE SEVEN WORDS – THE THREE HOURS

INTRODUCTION

The value, to the worshippers, of the Devotion of the Three Hours’ Agony is in proportion to the degree in which they understand that they are watching not so much the tragedy of nineteen hundred years ago as the tragedy of their own lives and times. Merely to dwell on the Death of Christ on Calvary would scarcely avail them more than to study the details of the assassination of Caesar at the foot of Pompey’s statue. Such considerations might indeed be interesting, exciting, and even a little instructive or inspiring; but they could not be better than this, and they might be no better than morbid and harmful.

The Death of Christ, however, is unique because it is, so to say, universal. It is more than the crowning horror of all murderous histories; it is more even than the type of all the outrages that men have ever committed against God. For it is just the very enactment, upon the historical stage of the world, of those repeated interior tragedies that take place in every soul that rejects or insults Him; since the God whom we crucify within is the same God that was once crucified without. There is not an exterior detail in the Gospel which may not be interiorly repeated in the spiritual life of a sinner; the process recorded by the Evangelists must be more or less identical with the process of all apostasy from God.

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