Pentecost, Plenitude of God’s Gift to Us

 

The divine gift to our souls reaches its culminating point in the gift of the Holy Ghost Who is the Gift par excellence: Altissimi Donum Dei, Gift of the Most High God.

The beautiful Feast of Pentecost is  the very crown of the Church’s liturgical year. And we have such need of it today! Now, more than ever, faithful hearts cry out, “Come Holy Ghost!, Creator blest!” The following excerpted from Divine Intimacy by Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalene, O.C.D.

Pentecost is the plenitude of God’s Gift to us. On Christmas Day, God gives us His only begotten Son, Christ Jesus, the mediator, the Bridge connecting humanity and divinity. During Holy Week, Jesus, by His Passion, gives Himself entirely for us, even to death on the Cross. He bathes us, purifying us and sanctifying us in His Blood. At Easter, Christ rises and His Resurrection, as well as His Ascension, is the pledge of our own glorification. He goes before us to His Father’s house to prepare a place for us, for in Him and with Him, we have become a part of the Divine Family; we have become children of God, destined for eternal beatitude.

Pentecost by Titian
The Descent of the Holy Ghost at Pentecost

 

But the gift of God to men does not end there; having ascended into heaven, Jesus, in union with the Father, sends us His Spirit, the Holy Ghost. The Father and the Holy Ghost loved us to the point of giving us the Word in the Incarnation; the Father and the Word so loved us as to give us the Holy Ghost. Thus, the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity give Themselves to man, stooping to this poor nothing to redeem him from sin, to sanctify him, and to bring him into their own intimacy.

Continue reading “Pentecost, Plenitude of God’s Gift to Us”

Evensong, 2016

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“O Mother who came to smile on me in the morn of my life, come once again and smile, dear Mother, for now it is eventide!”

(Prayer of St. Thérèse, the Little Flower)

Advent was a time of retreat and prayerful introspection and I took as my guide, St. Thérèse, the Little Flower. Her little way of spiritual childhood offers so much to us in the upheaval and uncertainty caused by this poor benighted pope. Today’s post is an old one, which I’ve updated – I hope you find it useful.

†  †  †

Time ill spent is lost forever and what degree of love we have achieved at the time of our death is what we shall have throughout eternity.

This tumultuous year draws to a close and it is natural for us to consider our gains and losses over this past year as we look towards the new year …

In this twilight of our Christian era, the darkness gathers. Eventually it will bring a purifying chastisement and a rebirth of the Faith. How long shall we endure the crass arrogance of the Humble Pope of Surprises? What will the long-awaited justice of God, when it appears, mean to us, to our loved ones?

“We must give every moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value for eternity.”
“We must give every moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value for eternity.”

Twilight is always a thoughtful, prayerful time for me, and so, “Evensong” is a hymn/prayer that accompanies me in this, the eventide of my life.

Sweet Savior, bless us ‘ere we go
Thy word into our hearts instill.
And make our lukewarm hearts to glow
With lowly love and fervent will.
Through life’s long day
And death’s dark night
O gentle Jesus, be our light.

My daily readings are from Divine Intimacy“, by Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D. In his reading titled, ”Let Us Make Good Use of Time.” Father Gabriel reminds us that time ill spent is lost forever and that what degree of love we have achieved at the time of our death is what we shall have throughout eternity.

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Christ the King in the Passion of the Church

Today, the last Sunday of October, we honor Our Lord Jesus Christ, King.

During His Passion, Pilate asked Our Lord Jesus Christ, “Art Thou the King of the Jews?” As St. John relates,

Jesus answered: ‘My kingdom is not of this world. If My kingdom were of this world, My servants would certainly strive that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now My kingdom is not from hence.’ Pilate therefore said to Him: Art Thou a king then? Jesus answered: ‘Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice.’

Pilate saith to Him: ‘What is truth?’ And when he said this, he went out again to the Jews…” (John 18, 33-38)

‘Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice.’

Notice that Pilate, after asking Jesus, “What is truth?” walked away without attending to His answer. Isn’t that typical of the posturing of the leaders of this world! Here is Jesus telling us that everyone who is of the truth hears His voice and Pilate proves that he is not of the truth by ignoring Christ the King’s voice.

Picture if you will, our King as He must have looked when He said these words, not in front of a cheering crowd, but instead, a jeering mob crying for His crucifixion and death. Not wearing splendid garments but clothed in His bloodied and dirtied robe; not crowned with gold and jewels but with hateful thorns. Thus His appearance affirms His message, that is, that His Kingdom is not of this world. There is enmity between His Kingdom and the false kingdoms of this world. It is a kingdom so sublime that nothing this world can do can impinge upon it, and it will have no end.

By affirming that “My kingdom is not of this world”, Our Lord was teaching that contrary to worldly kings who maintain  their transient rule by force of arms, by worldly power, His kingdom is absolute, it exists beyond time and will never end. His rule in encoded in our hearts, minds, in our wills and we ignore it at the peril of our souls.  There is no escaping it, and whether we accept it, shrug it off with indifference or combat it actively, we nevertheless serve it. Until He comes in glory, we must, in obedience to our thorn-crowned King, serve Him and proclaim His sovereignty in truth and love in all we do.

Today, more than ever, we proclaim His Reign. The leaders of the Church and the leaders of this world may turn away from this thorn-crowned King, but we know that He will triumph and they and all their useless pomp and foolishness will be gone in the blink of an eye. Never before have our prayers been given such efficacy; despite what the Bishop of Rome may say, we recite our prayers, be they litanies, rosaries, the Angelus, the Divine Office or the Little Office. Even when our prayers are forced through an act of the will from a heart burdened with the sorrows and disappointments of these bleak times; yes, especially when we least feel inclined to pray! Our Lord told Sister Josefa Menedez that that was when her prayers were most effective in saving poor sinners! (The Way of Divine Love, TAN Publishing).
Continue reading “Christ the King in the Passion of the Church”

The Plenitude of God’s Gift

The divine gift to our souls reaches its culminating point in the gift of the Holy Ghost Who is the Gift par excellence: Altissimi Donum Dei, Gift of the Most High God.

The beautiful Feast of Pentecost is, in a way, the very crown of the Church’s liturgical year. And we have such need of it today! More than ever, faithful hearts cry out, “Come Holy Ghost!, Creator blest!” The following excerpted from Divine Intimacy by Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalene, O.C.D.

Pentecost is the plenitude of God’s Gift to us. On Christmas Day, God gives us His only begotten Son, Christ Jesus, the mediator, the Bridge connecting humanity and divinity. During Holy Week, Jesus, by His Passion, gives Himself entirely for us, even to death on the Cross. He bathes us, purifying us and sanctifying us in His Blood. At Easter, Christ rises and His Resurrection, as well as His Ascension, is the pledge of our own glorification. He goes before us to His Father’s house to prepare a place for us, for in Him and with Him, we have become a part of the Divine Family; we have become children of God, destined for eternal beatitude.

Pentecost by Titian
The Descent of the Holy Ghost at Pentecost

But the gift of God to men does not end there; having ascended into heaven, Jesus, in union with the Father, sends us His Spirit, the Holy Ghost. The Father and the Holy Ghost loved us to the point of giving us the Word in the Incarnation; the Father and the Word so loved us as to give us the Holy Ghost. Thus, the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity give Themselves to man, stooping to this poor nothing to redeem him from sin, to sanctify him, and to bring him into their own intimacy.

Continue reading “The Plenitude of God’s Gift”

For this was I born

Pilate asked Our Lord Jesus Christ during His Passion,  “Art Thou the King of the Jews?” As St. John relates,

“Jesus answered: My kingdom is not of this world. If My kingdom were of this world, My servants would certainly strive that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now My kingdom is not from hence. Pilate therefore said to Him: Art Thou a king then? Jesus answered: Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice. Pilate saith to Him: What is truth? And when he said this, he went out again to the Jews…” (John 18, 33-38)

Notice that Pilate, after asking Jesus, “What is truth?” walked away without attending to His answer. Isn’t that typical of the posturing of the leaders of this world! Here is Jesus telling us that everyone who is of the truth hears His voice and Pilate proves that he is not of the truth by ignoring Christ the King’s voice.

Thou sayest it, I am a King.
Thou sayest it, I am a King.

Picture if you will, our King as He must have looked when He said these words, not in front of a cheering crowd, but a jeering mob crying for His crucifixion and death. Not wearing splendid garments but clothed in His bloodied and dirtied robe; not crowned with gold and jewels but with hateful thorns. Thus His appearance affirms His message, that is, that His Kingdom is not of this world. There is enmity between His Kingdom and the false kingdoms of this world. It is a kingdom so sublime that nothing this world can do can impinge upon it, and it will have no end.

This is a timeless message, even more appropriate today than it has been in the last 2,000 years. The leaders of the Church and the leaders of this world may turn away from this thorn-crowned King, but we know that He will triumph and they and all their useless pomp and foolishness will be gone in the blink of an eye. Never before have our prayers been given such efficacy; despite what the Bishop of Rome may say, we will recite our prayers, be they litanies, rosaries, the Angelus, the Divine Office or the Little Office. Even when they are forced through an act of the will from a heart burdened with the sorrows and disappointments of these bleak times; yes, especially when we least feel inclined to pray! Our Lord told Sister Josefa Menedez that that was when her prayers were most effective in saving poor sinners! (The Way of Divine Love, TAN Publishing).

Here is a prayer to Christ the King from Sister Carmela of the Holy Spirit, O.C.D.

Continue reading “For this was I born”

Evensong 2015

[If you are searching for information regarding the post author, evensong, it can be found on our “About” page.]

In this twilight of our Christian era, the darkness gathers. Eventually it will bring a purifying chastisement and a rebirth of the Faith. I am struck by the coincidence of the closing of my own life with this transition of our Christian era. This is a repost an old entry, I hope you don’t mind.

“We must give every moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value for eternity.”
“We must give every moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value for eternity.”

Twilight was always the favorite time of day for my Father-in-law and thus, it became mine. Evensong is a hymn/prayer that stays with me in the evening of my life.

Sweet Savior, bless us ‘ere we go
Thy word into our hearts instill.
And make our lukewarm hearts to glow
With lowly love and fervent will.
Through life’s long day
And death’s dark night
O gentle Jesus, be our light.

My daily readings are from Divine Intimacy, by Father Gabriel of St. Mary Magdalen, O.C.D. In his reading titled, ”Let Us Make Good Use of Time.” Father Gabriel reminds us that time ill spent is lost forever and that what degree of love we have achieved at the time of our death is what we shall have throughout eternity.

He then quotes Sister Carmela of the Holy Spirit, O.C.D. , who was under his spiritual direction, “We must give every moment its full amount of love, and make each passing moment eternal, by giving it value for eternity.” We do that by love, by doing every smallest task entrusted to us, with all the love of which we are capable.

Continue reading “Evensong 2015”

Christ the King and the Synod of Shame, 2015

Now that this blasphemous farcical Synod is finally over, we need to get back to the faith. I haven’t the heart, at present, to say more. Indeed, my heart is breaking for Our Lord Jesus Christ and His betrayed Bride. Most Precious Blood of Jesus, save us! The following post is all I have to offer at present, but I hope that it will help us focus on the enduring truths of our faith!

During His Passion, Pilate asked Our Lord Jesus Christ, “Art Thou the King of the Jews?” As St. John relates,

Jesus answered: ‘My kingdom is not of this world. If My kingdom were of this world, My servants would certainly strive that I should not be delivered to the Jews: but now My kingdom is not from hence.’ Pilate therefore said to Him: Art Thou a king then? Jesus answered: ‘Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice.’

'Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice.'
‘Thou sayest that I am a king. For this was I born, and for this came I into the world; that I should give testimony to the truth. Every one that is of the truth, heareth My voice.’

Pilate saith to Him: What is truth? And when he said this, he went out again to the Jews…” (John 18, 33-38)

Notice that Pilate, after asking Jesus, “What is truth?” walked away without attending to His answer. Isn’t that typical of the posturing of the leaders of this world! Here is Jesus telling us that everyone who is of the truth hears His voice and Pilate proves that he is not of the truth by ignoring Christ the King’s voice.

Picture if you will, our King as He must have looked when He said these words, not in front of a cheering crowd, but instead, a jeering mob crying for His crucifixion and death. Not wearing splendid garments but clothed in His bloodied and dirtied robe; not crowned with gold and jewels but with hateful thorns. Thus His appearance affirms His message, that is, that His Kingdom is not of this world. There is enmity between His Kingdom and the false kingdoms of this world. It is a kingdom so sublime that nothing this world can do can impinge upon it, and it will have no end.

Continue reading “Christ the King and the Synod of Shame, 2015”