June for the Sacred Heart of Jesus

Today, we begin the month of the Sacred Heart of Jesus with this repost of a popular article.

For love of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, we offer this essay of Solange Hertz, from her book (highly recommended!), The Thought of Their Heart, on Devotion to the Sacred Heart and the Holy Rosary”.

The Open Heart

by Solange Strong Hertz

“I will reveal My love to them more and more …”

The history of devotion to the Sacred Heart is in a very real sense a gradual revelation of the secret life of the Church. Its prologue, written in the heart of St. John as he reclined against the Lord’s breast at the Last Supper, broadcasts its first rhythms to the world, setting the tempo for the dramatic rending on Calvary. Veneration for the wound inflicted there seems to have been the initial form of the cult among the faithful. From this wound, the “door in the ark,” there gradually issued the proliferation of grace we now know as Sacred Heart devotion, ramifying and increasing through time, space and circumstance to fit all the needs and conditions of worshippers truly seeking intimacy with their Lord.

It elicited tears of repentance, prompted praise, encouraged confident petition and proffered earth’s reparation to heaven for its sins against Love. For centuries the movement developed quietly in the privacy of religious houses and the souls of gifted individuals until it permeated the whole Church in ranks both clerical and lay. In addition to the saints already mentioned, among its devotees must be numbered St. Anselm, St. Frances of Rome, St. Lawrence Justinian, St. Bernardine of Siena, St. Joan of Valois, St. Peter of Alcantara, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, St. Antoninus, St. Peter Canisius, St. Francis de Sales— to list but a few of those canonized. Others who spread its benefits are legion. Carthusians, Franciscans, Benedictines, Dominicans, each produced its particular “school” of spirituality based on affection for the wounded Heart of the Savior. The wealth of art, literature, and liturgy both canonical and popular which has come down to us on the subject attests to its vigor and sanctifying power.

Not surprisingly, it was St. John Eudes, the apostle of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, who was instrumental in directing modern piety towards the Heart of her Son. Called by Pope St. Pius X “initiator, teacher and apostle of the liturgical cult of the Sacred Heart,” he had begun by drawing heavily on the writings of the old Cologne Carthusians so as to establish the cult on solid theological ground. By 1672 he had succeeded in obtaining ecclesiastical approval for a Mass of the Sacred Heart to be celebrated in the communities of his own Order, the Congregation of Jesus and Mary.

The very next year, on the feast of St. John the Apostle, December 27, 1673, the torrents of private revelations converged explosively in the Visitation convent at Paray-le-Monial in France. It was there that our Lord, appearing to the humble young nun, St. Margaret Mary Alacoque, chose to set the seal of divine approval on what had until then been a most salutary practice in the Church, but which nevertheless remained a private affair— a kind of “inside track” for fleeter spirits. Our Lord had once told St. Gertrude:

“Whenever you desire to obtain anything from Me, offer Me My Heart, which I have so often given you as a token of our mutual friendship, in union with the love which made Me become man for the salvation of men; and I give you this special mark of friendship, … “

After four great apparitions in Paray from 1673 to 1675, … devotion to the Sacred Heart was soon to be enjoined upon all. If we are to believe the words of St. John the Apostle and the ancient prophets concerning the Heart of God, we who are living three hundred years later must be about to witness nothing less than the last moments of the world. “In the latter days you shall understand these things,” promised Jeremiah. “The THOUGHTS of HIS HEART to all generations: to deliver their souls from death and feed them in famine” (Introit, Mass of the Sacred Heart).

Continue reading “June for the Sacred Heart of Jesus”

St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

In honor of St. Margaret Mary Alacoque on this, her feast day, we present a few excerpts from a delightful collection of essays by the late Solange Strong Hertz. It is available in Kindle Edition, and titled: The Thought of Their Heart, on Devotion to the Sacred Heart and the Holy Rosary.

I will reveal My love to them more and more
I will reveal My love to them more and more

The Open Heart

by Solange Strong Hertz

The history of devotion to the Sacred Heart is in a very real sense a gradual revelation of the secret life of the Church. Its prologue, written in the heart of St. John as he reclined against the Lord’s breast at the Last Supper, broadcasts its first rhythms to the world, setting the tempo for the dramatic rending on Calvary. Veneration for the wound inflicted there seems to have been the initial form of the cult among the faithful. From this wound, the “door in the ark,” there gradually issued the proliferation of grace we now know as Sacred Heart devotion, ramifying and increasing through time, space and circumstance to fit all the needs and conditions of worshippers truly seeking intimacy with their Lord.

It elicited tears of repentance, prompted praise, encouraged confident petition and proffered earth’s reparation to heaven for its sins against Love. For centuries the movement developed quietly in the privacy of religious houses and the souls of gifted individuals until it permeated the whole Church in ranks both clerical and lay. In addition to the saints already mentioned, among its devotees must be numbered St. Anselm, St. Frances of Rome, St. Lawrence Justinian, St. Bernardine of Siena, St. Joan of Valois, St. Peter of Alcantara, St. Fidelis of Sigmaringen, St. Antoninus, St. Peter Canisius, St. Francis de Sales— to list but a few of those canonized. Others who spread its benefits are legion. Carthusians, Franciscans, Benedictines, Dominicans, each produced its particular “school” of spirituality based on affection for the wounded Heart of the Savior. The wealth of art, literature, and liturgy both canonical and popular which has come down to us on the subject attests to its vigor and sanctifying power.

Continue reading “St. Margaret Mary Alacoque”

Seven Trumpets

In answer to requests, we will be looking at the state of the Bergoglio Church in the light of the Message of Fatima and the Apocalypse. Sister Lucia is reported to have remarked when asked about the Third Secret that it was to be found in the Apocalypse, especially Chapters 8-13; that is to say, beginning with the Seven Trumpets.

Prior to Fatima, Our Lady appeared at Quito, La Salette, Knock and (after Fatima) at Akita, all of which had a common thread of dire warning. Even though the apparition at Knock was silent, its prophetic relevance is clear from our perspective after 50 years of modernist “renewal”. Let’s start with Pope Paul’s Trumpets: In an interview with the Italian newspaper Avvenire, French writer Jean Guitton, a close friend of Pope Paul VI, recalled this interesting bit of history,

“It was the final session of the Council, the most essential in which the Pope was to bestow upon all humanity the teachings of the Council. He announced this to me with these words, ‘I am about to blow the Seven Trumpets of the Apocalypse.’ “ (Interview, 11 October, 1992, cited in the excellent book, Animus Delendi – I, by Atila Sinke Guimaraes).

Now, the source of this quote, Avvenire,  is the newspaper of the Italian Episcopal Conference, so it is fairly safe to assume the integrity of the information. Although Guitton seemed to think little of the remark, later mentioning that the Apocalypse speaks of the triumph of the Church, that is not exactly what is referred to in the passage cited by Pope Paul VI. The Angels and Trumpets are introduced in Chapter 8, “And I saw seven angels standing in the presence of God; and there were given to them seven trumpets.”  The Angels  and Trumpets and the events they usher in are  severe chastisements, foretelling in symbolic language widespread heresy, apostasy, violent wars and persecutions, and earthquakes.

Later, 29 June, 1972 on the occasion of the Ninth Anniversary of his election, Paul Paul lamented,

And there were given to them seven trumpets…

“We believed that after the [Second Vatican] Council would come a day of sunshine in the history of the Church. But instead there has come a day of clouds and storms, and of darkness …  “And how did this come about? We will confide to you the thought that maybe we ourselves admit in free discussion, that may be unfounded, and that is that there has been a power, an adversary power. Let us call him by his name: the Devil. … It is as if from some mysterious crack, no, it is not mysterious, from some crack the smoke of Satan has entered the Temple of God.”

Pope Paul’s quote comes from the Apocalypse, Chapter 9, verses 1-2:

“And the fifth angel sounded the trumpet, and I saw a star fall from heaven upon the earth, and there was given to him the key of the bottomless pit. And he opened the bottomless pit: and the smoke of the pit arose, as the smoke of a great furnace; and the sun and the air were darkened with the smoke of the pit.” 

It goes on to describe how from the smoke of the pit come locusts, which are interpreted by some commentators as heretics, in fact, that is one of the explanations given in the Douay Rheims Bible.

In addition, the darkening of the sun is also seen as prophetic for a loss of faith.

In his fictional work, Windswept House, Father Malachi Martin described the Enthronement of Lucifer within the Vatican on 29 June, 1963, which of course was the date that Montini ascended the Papacy as Paul VI. In a subsequent interview, Father Martin confirmed that the Enthronement of Satan had actually occurred although he changed some details for his fictional account.

In March 2010, Father Gabriele Amorth, the chief Vatican exorcist, told Italian newspaper La Repubblica: “The devil resides in the Vatican and you can see the consequences. … He added: “When one speaks of ‘the smoke of Satan’ [a phrase coined by Pope Paul VI in 1972] in the holy rooms, it is all true – including these latest stories of violence and paedophilia.”

Continue reading “Seven Trumpets”