The Judas Complex and Pope Francis

Odd, isn’t it that Pope Francis has such a tender spot for Judas the betrayer of Christ?  In Monday’s (11/4/2016) homily at Msgr. Ricca’s residence, Pope Francis opined, “It hurts when I read that small passage from the Gospel of Matthew, when Judas, who has repented, goes to the priests and says: ‘I have sinned’ and wants to give … and gives them the coins. ‘Who cares! – they say to him: it’s none of our business!’ They closed their hearts before this poor, repentant man, who did not know what to do. And he went and hanged himself.” (Vatican Radio) [Note: Pope Francis really did call Judas a “poor, repentant man” !]

“…none of them is lost, but the son of perdition…”

To Francis, Judas “repented”, even though Judas never acknowledged his sin to Jesus Christ, who is the One whom he offended. For Francis, Judas’s worldly regret expressed to the “doctors of the law” was sufficient, ignoring Jesus entirely. Odd that this Vicar of Christ seems not to understand that the victim of every sin is Jesus Christ and reparation must be to Him.

So, Pope Francis teaches us, Judas was “this poor, repentant man”. Thus, once again Pope Francis is greater in mercy than Our Lord Jesus Christ, who prayed to His Father, shortly before Judas betrayed Him, “While I was with them, I kept them in Thy name. Those whom Thou gavest me have I kept; and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition, that the scripture may be fulfilled. (John 17, 12)

Thinking on this strange Pope’s even stranger affinity for Judas recalled to mind Father Malachi Martin’s writing about the Judas Complex among the Modernist Churchmen who infest the Church. His 1990 book, “The Keys of This Blood”,  has a final portion titled “Coda, the Protocol of Salvation” which contains a fascinating analysis of the precise situation in which we find ourselves today, under a pope who asserts himself as more merciful and practical than Jesus Christ, whom he insists he represents. Indeed, as he himself reminds us, he is  “by the will of Christ Himself – the supreme Pastor and Teacher of all the faithful”. And that he enjoys, “supreme, full, immediate, and universal ordinary power in the Church”.

The term “Coda”  refers to something that ends a work, its completion, and not only refers to the end of the book, but also the completion of the modernist revolution in the Church. In the first chapter of Coda, Fr. Martin explains the Judas Complex, that is, the compromise engaged in by the worldly, pragmatic Judas, who was certain that he was destined to steer Jesus away from His impractical insistence on the spiritual at the expense of the “real concerns of those living in the real world”. Martin writes that initially, Judas was certain that he could, by a “decent compromise, ensure Jesus’ success in the world by compacting with the world’s leaders.”

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